Studying Puddles

Rain is part of the environmental cycle. So rain is seen every now and again, whether we like it or not! So it makes sense to produce 3D scenes that include wet surfaces and puddles. In this article I will be studying how rain affects materials and how to re-produce them in the virtual environment. To start I set out after a rainy day to take some photo’s in my local area. Paying particular attention to how rain affects tarmac. The way light bounces back from the wet tarmac really equalises the scene.

puddles edit

This is the result of the tutorial video. This gave me a node setup I understood by following the tutorial. So adding modifications is easy and understandable. From the result I highlighted areas for improvement. I wanted to take full advantage of the displacement map; so that the water slips into the lower spaces in detail. To do this I multiplied the bump map in the material nodes to get this result.

Realflow Demo

I learnt from my time at The-Neighbourhood that Realflow (particle simulation engine) can be used to create complicated and realistic water effects. This software is largely used in the VFX industry to create such effects for films and simulations.

I’ve spent some time learning this software and I’m happy to post my first results!

Using 3DS Max allowed me to use 3rd party render engines, giving me fantastic results! Although importing Realflow simulations does not support motion blur, I found rendering a short sequence then bluing them together afterwards created a similar result.

Excited to use Realflow in future projects!

PentaxMX

My first photographs using an old SLR, Pentax MX. I was worried all these photos would be either over or under exposed, thankfully my shutter-time judgement was correct. Using a fixed wide angle lens with a completely open aperture was a good first choice, this gave me enough light to play with. I love the warm and green colours produced by this film, the picture inst completely sharp but gives a soft feel.

Ink and cream clouds

Inspired by the work of Alberto Seveso, I set out to create a small set of images using my EOS700d and a small fish tank filled to the rim with water. After a small amount of research I found cream was best to produce these cloud like forms when dropped into the water. Temperature of the water was important, too cold and the inks would drop to the bottom, too warm and they would hug the surface. Shooting in RAW helps me pull out the natural colours taken from the camera that I can then boost in Photoshop later.

I would like to revisit this form of photography using a slight more lit setup, thus allowing less depth of focus to capture more of the detail.

Snowy Asylum

A thick layer of snow fell over stockport, brought my camera to college to find college was closing, feeling productive I revisited the Asylum. One of my favourite photography locations. I made sure to use the Cameras large colour depth to boost the perceptual saturation so the viewer could see more colours than they would their naked eye.